For the sake of a song

Wulumen Tulh

CD 7, Track 28

TRACK 28 (Cro00-01-s07) Song 12: Wulumen Tulh

   
Sung text  Free Translation 
wulumen kidin-mitit-a-gu wulu tulhwulumen kidin-mitit-a tulhmiyi-gu kidin-mitit-a-gumiyi-gu kidin tulh kisjiwulumen tulh kidin-mitit-a kisjiwulumen tulh kidin-mitit-a kisjimiyi-gu kidin nal kisjikidin-mitit-a-guwulumen tulh kidin-mitit-a-gu kisjiwulumen tulh kidin-mitit-a kisjimiyi-gu kidin nal kisji  This is what made the old man angry, Old Man Tulh It made Old Man Tulh angryIt was the tucker [Hairy Cheeky Yam] that made him angryIt was the tucker that made Tulh [angry] like thisIt made old man Tulh angry, like thisIt made old man Tulh angry, like thisIt was the tucker [that made him angry] just like thisThis is what made him angryOld Man Tulh, it made him angry like this Old Man Tulh, it made him angry like thisIt was the tucker that did it, just like this 

The song on tracks 28 and 29 relates to the story of the Ma-yawa ancestor known as Wulumen Tulh (‘Old Man Tulh’) and the Dreaming Tjiwilirr ‘Hairy Cheeky Yam’. This song, together with its associated myths and paintings, is discussed in detail in Marett, 2005, pp 15-23 (see also Ford & Nemarluk, 2003). In brief, the story relates how Old Man Tulh came back from hunting to his camp at Pumurriyi to find that his wives had not prepared any food. He therefore ate some raw hairy cheeky yam (tjiwilirr), which is toxic when uncooked. He was so angry that he threw it everywhere, which is why it now grows prolifically at Pumurriyi.

The quality of the original recording of this song was poor. Nonetheless, because the song is so important, we have included it here.

Wangga Image

A bark painting by Charlie Niwilhi Brinken, showing Wulumen Tulh on the left, and the singer himself on the right (for further information see discussion in Marett, 2005, p 17).